A Nutritional War Between Roasted And Raw Nuts – Which One Is Better?

Nuts are very healthy and have many essential minerals and nutrients that benefit your body. Many people eat them raw whereas, many people love to eat them roasted or cooked. You can eat them as a snack because it is ready to eat item. The best part is you can also use it to make various recipes such as Desserts, Biscuits, and Cakes etc. It is the fact that both raw and roasted nut have their own way to benefits the body, but it is the fact that roasted nut tends to be healthier than the raw one. Here is a difference between roasted vs. raw nuts that will help you to understand that which type is better for health.

  • The Nutrients Value – Roasted nuts are usually being roasted in little oil and contain salt that can increase value of the sodium intake. It is the fact that roasted nuts are rich in calories as compared to raw nuts, so if you are looking for a weight gain then, roasted nuts can be your best choice.
  • Taste Factor – Both types of nuts have their own different taste, but usually people like roasted nuts because it contains flavors. Raw nuts are simplistic in taste and sometimes a person gets bored by eating them. You can eat both of them as a snack as they both have their own unique taste and nutrition value.
  • Bacteria – Raw nuts have the higher chances of bacterial attack whereas, bacteria cannot affect the roasted nuts easily. It is the fact that a huge amount or harmful bacteria get eliminate after the roasting process. The number of contaminates also get removed after the cleaning process of the nuts that makes them safe for our health.
  • Chemical Process – Many manufacturers use the chemical method to roast the nuts, so it is very important to buy it from a trustworthy manufacturer to get the good quality product. Chemical harms the nutrition of the nuts and makes them tasteless because of which many people opt for raw nuts rather than the roasted one.

These are some differences between raw and roasted nuts. Both are good for health,so you can choose according to your taste and preferences. It is very important to buy the nuts from a good supplier to get fresh and premium products. Both roasted and raw nut are healthy in nature and they are available at a very affordable price, so one can easily buy them. Make sure to buy from a good manufacturer as a good one will always deliver you the fresh and pure products.

Store Your Nuts The Right Way To Keep Them Fresh And Tasty

Nuts like Almonds, Cashew, Walnuts are very much good of our health, as they are loaded with a number of Vitamins, Minerals, Proteins, and other nutrients your body requires. Choosing the best of its quality is important to reap their real benefits for your good health and not only buying, but preserving them for a longer period is also important. Storing them is the main concern most of the people face and if you also don’t know how to preserve it the right way, so, here we are with some of our tips. Take a look and store your nuts the right way without affecting their freshness and taste.

  • Keep It In Cool And Dry Condition: One of the important things you need to keep in mind to store the nuts right way is, always keep them in cool and dry conditions. They get damaged when easily get in touch with the moisture, so, always keep them in an air-tight container in cool and dry conditions to ensure their long shelf life and preserve their taste.
  • Never Leave Them Open: If you leave your nuts open, so, they easily absorb the odor of the material around them and get damaged in most of the conditions, therefore, it is important to store them in air-tight containers.
  • Keep Them In Freezer: Whether you accept it or not, but is a true fact that nuts, especially almonds if stored in the freezer or refrigerator, so they can remain as it is up to a year. Freezing won’t let them lose their taste and keep them fresh for a longer period.
  • Keep Them Away From Humid Conditions: Humidity is the true killer of nuts; they affect not only their life but taste as well. Therefore, you shouldn’t keep them in a humid atmosphere to preserve their freshness and delightful taste.
  • Seal The Bag: If you buy roasted nuts, so, you have to keep them away from coming in contact with the oxygen, therefore, it is advisable to keep them in vacuum bags or seal them properly to secure their shelf life.

These are some of the easy and common tips that help you store nuts in a better way that too for a longer period. So, the next time, don’t panic if you buy nuts in bulk quantity, as now you know the right way to store them correctly. You can even ask the dry fruits manufacturers from where you buy the nuts; they may surely provide such suggestion to you.

Why Cook? Why Catering?

Catering is perhaps one of the most important aspects of event planning that will help make or break any business meeting, fundraising gala or wedding events. That’s why the catering manager often takes the lead to help clients plan and execute special events and other one-day programs at hotels and other venues. And many people who enjoy choosing food and beverage dream about becoming a caterer and opening their own catering business.

When it comes a time when you’re thinking about cooking for however many people, it becomes time-consuming, that’s why numbers matter. This is why cooking for a normal family size is great, but when it becomes over 4 or 6 people let’s bring out the catering help! Consider how many people you can fit in your space – if you’re planning an outdoor event, remember everyone might end up inside if it rains! If you want to have large numbers in a small area, suggesting people drop in between certain hours rather than all arriving at a designated time can ease the crowds.

Another important tip is time management; A time plan is a really useful tool to stay on top of your plans. Write a list of everything that needs to be ordered or arranged – flowers, helping hands, food, drinks, equipment, decorations. Assign days and check them off when they’re completed. The food, drink and home preparation will need a more detailed plan and it’s worth assigning times as well as days to these. Be realistic, it’s better to give yourself too much time. If reading through your time plan makes you feel unduly stressed, you may have taken on too much so look at ways you can simplify your choices. Providing a relaxed and fun event with a small selection of different but well-cooked dishes is better than an overambitious spread which turns out to be hit and miss.

Now it’s time to invite your friends and family – Most importantly, let’s have fun. Your event invitation will make an impression on your guests and – as the first item they’ll see regarding this event – can convince them to attend or persuade them to stay home. So don’t miss out on this important opportunity to get your friends and family excited, engaged and talking about your upcoming event. Make sure your event stands out and as always remember the things to consider when planning an event.

How a Pleasant Shopping Experience Can Make Your Day

Would anyone in this world be jubilant about spending at least 2.5 hours in a grocery store? Well, I can honestly say, “I would not.” However, my shopping experience today was a very satisfying.

To begin, to put this experience into context, let me describe for you our new, enormous marketplace grocery store that recently opened in our neighborhood. This store has almost everything that one might desire. First and foremost, for me, there is a coffee shop, not to mention a wine bar, where you can stop and have a drink of wine and socialize before or after your shopping experience. Once you have tackled your grocery list, if there is just a little left over in your budget, you can treat yourself to a piece of clothing or a pair of shoes.

Now that I have set the tone of my experience, let me move on to the gist of my article, why in the world did this shopping experience last 2.5 hours. Well, to begin, I had just returned from an early morning medical appointment and I had not had my morning cup of java and anyone that knows me, can understand why that would be a problem. So, my first stop was the coffee shop. Once, I had my first sip, I was good to go. However, my stomach alerted me that the shopping experience would not be good, if my hunger was not satisfied. Just in the nick of time, while at the food deli, I was greeted by one of the store employees and I questioned her about breakfast foods. She immediately pointed me into the direction of a rack where there was one large Meat Lover’s Burrito left. Without hesitation, I grabbed the burrito, returned to the coffee area to eat it.

Now that my hunger had been satisfied, I moved on to the vegetable and fruit area. While picking out my vegetables, there was another shopper who had on nautical clothing. So, I kindly mentioned to her that her attire would be the perfect outfit for me, as I am planning to go on a cruise in a few weeks. She responded and we socialized for just a little bit. I noticed that she was removing her earrings and without hesitation, she gave them to me and went on to explain her reasoning. She thought they would go very well with my cruising experience, as the theme was, of course, nautical. I stated that I could not accept her earrings; however, she insisted because she indicated she had another pair exactly like this pair. Remembering what my mother taught me, “to always be humble and graciously, thankful for any gift that I receive.” So, I thanked her for the gift and mentioned that I would tuck them away in a safe place until my trip.

Moving on, my next area would be the gourmet cheese section and there I met another shopper where her and I discussed the various cheeses that was displayed in the counter. She, pleasantly, began to share with me her experience with cheese and she sounded like a “cheese expert” to me. I should have mentioned early in the article that my family deemed a “social butterfly” early in life and I have lived up to that reputation since then. So, our conversation continued for well over 15 minutes, of course, drifting off to several other topics. After a while, we shared what area of the community that we lived in and would you believe that she turned out to be my neighbor, whom I had met approximately four years ago. We both moved into the community around the same time. Subsequently, we shared our contact information, once again, and both of us decided that we needed to get back to shopping and agreed to stay in touch.

Finally, my grocery shopping was all done and I proceeded on to the check-out counter. In conclusion, my hope is that by sharing my experience, it will challenge others to take the time to reach out to others. Extend a friendly compliment to someone, or pay it forward; and, hopefully, the positive experience will help set a tone for the rest of your day, as well as the other individual with whom you interacted.

Hold the Mayo

The first time it dawned on me there were two distinct camps regarding mayonnaise was one afternoon at a restaurant. I was having lunch with a good friend, and she was interrogating the waitress about the chicken salad plate, asking her, “This doesn’t have any of that horrible Miracle Whip, does it?” The waitress assured her it was pure mayo that held those little morsels together. My friend seemed relieved and ordered it, but I ordered something else. I am in the Miracle Whip camp, and I make no apologies.

I admit I come by it honestly. I grew up in a Miracle Whip household, and I inherited my mother’s dislike for mayonnaise. early. To this day, I buy only MW and so does my sister. But mayo holds top honors in the condiment world, at least in the U.S., tied only with ketchup in popularity, and a must-have on millions of sandwiches daily, as well as in salads and sauces. Some fanatics even put it on french fries.

As a child, I frequently asked my mother why some sandwiches or salads tasted “gross” until I understood that MW had a distinctly different flavor than traditional mayo, which, in my opinion, has no flavor at all. (Please, no hate mail). When it finally clicked in my young mind, and I understood the difference, it was MW all the way from then on.

But let’s travel back in time to learn about mayo, and the French passion that started it all. The creation of mayonnaise is credited to the chef of Duke de Richelieu in 1756. While the Duke was defeating the British at Port Mahon in Menorca, Spain, his chef was whipping up a special victory feast that included a unique sauce made with eggs and cream, staples of French cuisine. Some food historians insist that the Spanish pioneered the rich spread, but it seems more likely that the French did the honors. Word of mouth (and taste buds) traveled across the pond, and Americans quickly embraced the creamy madness. Many residents of French heritage, not to mention chefs searching for new frontiers, introduced it in New York City, and we know that by 1838, the popular restaurant Delmonico’s in Manhattan offered mayonnaise in a variety of dishes. Gourmets were hooked.

Soon chefs were dreaming up different ways to use the wildly popular spread, especially in salads. In 1896, the famous Waldorf salad, made its debut to rave reviews at a charity ball at the Waldorf Hotel, chock full of apple pieces, celery, walnuts and grapes, all held together by that creamy mayo, and diners couldn’t get enough.

As refrigeration blossomed at the turn of the century, hundreds of food manufacturers raced to get their version of mayo in the shops. One such manufacturer was Hellmann’s, a New York City brand which designed wide mouth jars that could accommodate large spoons and scoops, and they soon began to dominate the sector. Mayonnaise, which had heretofore been considered a luxury, was fast becoming a household staple and taking its place at the dinner tables in millions of homes. Many professional chefs and homemakers made their own versions, but jars of the popular condiment were featured prominently on grocery store shelves.

Enter Miracle Whip, created in 1933 by the Chicago-based Kraft Foods Company. It made its debut during the Depression as a cheaper alternative to mayo, and while it does contain the key ingredients of mayonnaise (egg, soybean oil, vinegar, water), it deviates from the standard of mayo with a sweet, spicy flavor that many folks preferred and still do, but is required to label itself as “salad dressing” rather than mayo.

So whether you are a straight mayonnaise user, a renegade Miracle Whip aficionado, or you are frequently heard to state “hold the mayo”, there’s no getting around this wildly popular condiment, and we can thank the French gourmands once again for this creation.

Some Facts About Pike Cavair As a Source of Health

In this article, we will talk about the benefits of pike caviar and its effect on health. Pike caviar is a product that is rich in protein, vitamins and has a lot of useful properties. This product can be useful to athletes, to people who are experiencing high physical and mental stress.

Speaking about the price, it is interesting that in the old days pike caviar was expensive, only the rich could buy it, so it was considered a royal delicacy. You can buy caviar in a jar, already cooked. But it is easy to prepare it at home.

To prepare it at home, this product from a chilled or fresh pike you need to clean from unnecessary films, put in a colander, rinse with boiling water. You need to add salt and mix. Put in a jar and cover with a layer of vegetable oil. Then you must store the caviar in the cold. This product is useful for those who have lowered hemoglobin. From it you can make excellent sandwiches and snacks.

This caviar is the pike’s eggs that have high biological value. Its taste and nutritional qualities make it possible to refer it to a better kind of caviar. The value of this caviar is the same as red and black, thanks to its useful properties and taste. It has a balanced composition, so it is used to solve many health problems. It contains protein, vitamin A, E, B 9, fatty acids, amino acids and macro-elements easily digestible by the human body: potassium, phosphorus, calcium and iodine. The use of pike caviar positively affects the condition of the skin, thanks to the presence of protein in it. This product is also effective in reducing immunity, which helps to avoid catarrhal diseases. Thanks to regular consumption of pike caviar, it is possible to normalize blood pressure and increase the hemoglobin content in the blood. It is the source of iodine, which helps keep the thyroid healthy.

Vitamin D, contained in this product, takes part in the development of bones. To prevent rickets, it is recommended that this product has to be eaten by children from the age of three. Such caviar is used to reduce the level of “bad” cholesterol and in the presence of cardiovascular diseases. Eating pike caviar, which is rich in iron, improves blood composition and strengthens the body with reduced hemoglobin. Fluoride, which is part of this product, has a strengthening effect on the enamel of the teeth and prevents the appearance of dental diseases. Pike caviar is also an additional source of minerals such as copper, chromium, calcium. Specialists recommend it to people who have high mental and physical stress, as well as those who are in the stage of recovery from severe operations, diseases and injuries. It is known that eating it, you can increase visual acuity. This product is an effective remedy for protecting the nervous system and relieving the effects of stress. Using it, you can restore sexual dysfunction, since it is an aphrodisiac.

This product can’t be used by children under three years of age and by people who have an individual intolerance. At an early age, it can cause allergies. Do not forget that caviar can be substandard, so the choice of pike caviar should be approached carefully. Caviar can be harmful to pregnant women, as it contributes to the retention of excess fluid in the body. Contraindication for the consumption of it may be an exacerbation of any chronic disease. Eating large amounts of this product can cause hypertension.

Underated Garium Sulphate

The Underated garium sulphate!

Over the years I have heard a lot of people condemn the intake of soaked Garri (also known as Garium Sulphate, cassava flakes) and have reduced it to a poor man’s meal. Take your time to read through this article, you will understand the nutritional benefits of taking soaked Garri as a normal meal.

Garri is a popular West African food made from cassava tuber. The soaked garri is a popular fast food for majority of people in Nigeria. Moreover, it could simply be taken as regular flakes and mostly taken when the weather is hot (in the afternoon or at night).

Best ways to soak garri

Garri is basically associated to poor people because it’s sold very cheap (measured in cups), easy to prepare and can be prepared with nothing but only water. Therefore, those that can’t afford a decent meal would rather go for it. Hey! That’s for poor people, left to me garri is for rich dudes but have been abused by the poor. I have met a lot of rich people who really enjoy taking garri as a meal. An average Nigerian in one way or the other must have taken garri. I was amazed when T-boss (from Big Brother Naija, BBN) opened her mouth to say she had never taken garri. I don’t really want to talk about that now.

Nevertheless, there are special ways of preparing your lovely soaked cassava flakes. This is how a normal garri looks like without adding anything:

Things you need to prepare it:

a. Cassava flakes
b. Water
c. Cubes of sugar
d. Groundnuts or kuli kuli
e. A tin of milk
f. Ice blocks or cold water
g. Fried/grilled fish or Pkomo (also known as Canda)
h. Coconut

Adding these things properly together makes up a decent soaked garium sulphate and can cost about N700, which is far above an average Nigerian’s meal. Moreover, there are nutritional benefits of soaked garri. Garium sulphate is rich in fiber, magnesium, Vitamin A (for yellow cassava) and copper. This directly implies that garri made from yellow cassava can improve your eye sight and when taken according to my prescription above will give you a balanced diet. Therefore you have no worries, because a plate of soaked garri can make your day (especially if your day was hectic).

Be proud of Africa and its wonderful heritage. I love My Africa!

Totally Sauced

What would we do without our favorite sauces? Whether you are a soy sauce fan, a steak sauce addict or a Worcestershire aficionado, we love our condiments and sauces, so come along as we review a few favorites.

Like many condiments, soy sauce originates in ancient China as a way to stretch salt, which was historically expensive. The beginnings of soy sauce are traced back to the Zhou Dynasty around 2000 B.C., using fermented pulverized fish with salt as a condiment. The plentiful soybeans used in the fermentation process helped to stretch the salt content, making it more affordable for the Chinese people. When introduced to the Japanese, they used their uniquely brewed soybeans, and by the middle of the seventeenth century, the process would replace the need for so much salt, which popularized soy sauce throughout Japan as well as neighboring Asian countries.

Dutch traders discovered the tangy sauce and began carrying it back to Holland in barrels, where its popularity spread throughout western Europe. In the 1800’s, thousands of Chinese arrived on the West Coast of the U.S. looking for work, and they brought their distinctive style of cooking and recipes with them. Eventually soy sauce became one of the components of Worcestershire sauce, which was developed in England in the 1800’s.

Worcestershire sauce is named after the city where it was created, Worcester, England. It’s believed that a local British aristocrat, who had been a Governor of Bengal, discovered the sauce while living in India and wanted it reproduced for his fellow Englishmen upon his return home. He visited a chemist shop in Worcester, asking for the recipe he had to be duplicated. The two chemists, Lea and Perrins, created the sauce as best they could, but found they disliked the concoction and stored it in their cellar. Some time later, after it had fermented, they re-tasted the preparation to discover it was delicious. Although today, the ingredients are listed on the label, the exact recipe has never been revealed and still remains a closely guarded secret. As Lea and Perrins sauce became popular, others scrambled to create something similar. Just in the city of Worcester alone, there were originally over 30 varieties of the sauce, but Lea and Perrins has dominated from the beginning. During that time, plain and tough meats were greatly enhanced by sauces, and Lea and Perrins was welcomed on dinner tables, eventually finding its way to the U.S. during the nineteenth century.

Steak sauce was created around 1824 by the chef of King George IV in England. Although some historians claim that the King may have pronounced the sauce “A1” which lead to its name, it is possible that steak sauce was created in 1824 back in Richmond, Virginia by Matt Leader, who had been a chef to King George IV. Labeled “steak sauce” for almost 50 years, in 2014, Kraft Foods declared that A1 Steak Sauce “is no longer just for steak”, and removed that moniker from its label. They proclaimed that A1 Sauce is good “for almost everything.”

Needless to say, there are countless sauces on the grocery shelves to accommodate everyone’s taste, or perhaps you are a minimalist and prefer using just a bit of salt and pepper. Whatever your taste buds dictate, there’s no denying that we love our seasonings and sauces, no matter where we live.

Everyone Say Cheese!

Truly one of life’s great pleasures, who doesn’t like cheese. Stack it on your burger, add it to a sandwich,eat it plain, mix it in casseroles and that all-time favorite, mac and cheese, there is a type for every taste bud, age and budget. Dating back thousands of years B.C. cheese was first created by populations who herded milk-producing animals. The art of cheese making was refined over the centuries until it became a staple of Western Europeans, from the poor to the royals and everyone in between. Whether you’re an aficionado of fine gourmet cheeses, or an unapologetic fan of Velveeta, there’s nothing quite like it. Pity the lactose intolerant who have to pass on cheese..

Well, this time the Chinese were out of the loop. Cheese clearly was created in areas of Europe which are now Poland and its environs, possibly as far back as 7000 B.C. In all fairness, the Chinese did not use dairy and presumably didn’t herd milk-producing animals, so they had no hand in creating cheese or milk products at all.

Ancient herders discovered that milk solids could be turned into a cheese-like substance, and since cheese lasted far longer than milk, which easily spoiled, it was a popular food for travelers and shepherds. But early cheeses were undoubtedly bland, liquidy and probably resembled our present day cottage cheese. As cheese making processes were refined and different varieties created, this wonderful food took on a whole new persona. Greeks embraced cheese, which they made with sheep and goat’s milk, and their cheese tended to be crumbly, similar to present-day feta. Adding a few herbs to the milk mixture gave it flavor, and cheese traveled well, providing a good source of protein for their ancient armies.

Soon royalty had their chefs pursue the art of cheese making, and it spread through Western Europe, quickly embraced by the Roman Empire. Monks joined in, understanding that along with their staples of bread and wine, cheese provided a substantial meal in the monasteries. Once it reached France, a country synonymous with the word “cheese”, the French took it to a whole new level, enjoying the creamy textures and creating cuisine around the various varieties they produced (think Camembert, Brie and Roquefort). Today, every region of France boasts their own particular cheese.

And speaking of Roquefort, how many of us get confused by the different varieties and the interchangeable term “blue cheese?” Let’s clear this up. Blue cheese is basically a generic term. There are three major types: Roquefort (French), Gorgonzola (Italian) and Stilton (British). The U.S. was kind of left out with this variety, (but don’t tell that to people in Wisconsin). Roquefort and Gorgonzola are two variations of blue cheese. Roquefort is French, made from sheep’s milk, and Gorgonzola is Italian, made from cow’s milk. Roquefort has a sharpness, but not as strong and robust as Gorgonzola. And then there is Stilton. A popular British version, but considered to be a poor cousin in the eyes of cheese connoisseurs.

Originating in the village of Somerset, England, cheddar cheese is a hard, off-white, sharp-tasting natural cheese. (The orange color is added.) It is probably the most popular type in the U.S. and is what the so-called American cheese (which isn’t really cheese at all) is modeled after. Europeans enjoy cheddar in its natural white color and frequently end a meal with a plate of room temperature cheeses and fruits. Most foodies eschew American cheese, which adorns our fast food cheeseburgers and our beloved mac and cheese. And then there’s Velveeta, considered the bottom of the barrel (but great for cooking).

Not to be slighted, Switzerland caught up with France and created their own wonderful versions. Their most popular are Gruyere and Emmental, which is called Swiss cheese in the U.S.

With the popularity of wine these days, what better accompaniment than cheese? Whether you favor a sharp cheddar, a smooth Gouda, a tangy Swiss or a creamy Brie, there’s just no getting around it: say cheese!

Pile on the Pasta

Those Chinese did it again. While we think of pasta as a culturally Italian food, it likely originates from ancient Asian noodles. No one knows for sure, but credit is often given to merchant and explorer Marco Polo as responsible for bringing pasta back to Italy during the 13th century. Noodles had been a staple in China for over 2000 years. They likely were made with rice, but once Italians embraced the noodles, they began to use plentiful wheat flour to produce their famous spaghetti.

However, historical references may indeed dispute pasta’s Asian origin, as various pasta-type foods are mentioned in earlier centuries. Enter the Greeks, who originally occupied Naples, a southern region of Italy and are thought to have introduced a pasta- like food to the Neapolitans. Since Italy’s major grain producers and processors were in the south, it’s highly likely that long, thin pasta made its way north to Rome and other cities. Long before Marco Polo, first century Roman poet Horace described thin sheets of dough called lagana and served fried as an everyday food. Several centuries later, this dough was stuffed with meat and perhaps made way for present day lasagna.

By the sixteenth century, the dried version made storage easy, and who knows, perhaps Columbus carried the food on his voyage to discover America, as did many ships who made expeditions into parts unknown. The availability of pasta and its versatility made it a hit throughout Europe, and cooks found it easy to create new dishes. Originally eaten by hand, once sauces were introduced as an accompaniment, utensils took a prominent place on dining tables.

So when did the U.S. get its first taste of pasta? While it originally adorned the tables of the wealthy, in the late 1800’s our modern version of spaghetti caught on, first in the restaurants of Italian immigrants, then across the nation as a filling and economical meal for families. While some cooks did not serve it with tomato sauce, the different forms of pasta could be added to soups or mixed with vegetables.

Believe it or not, Thomas Jefferson is said to have brought back a pasta machine from his European travels, and his daughter, who was the lady of the house, served pasta dishes with Parmesan cheese. (Imagine her horror to learn that mass-produced boxes of mac and cheese would eventually populate grocery store shelves.) Later on, other fans substituted Cheddar, and it became a crowd pleaser and favorite of the American diet. What would childhood be without mac and cheese?

In the mid-twentieth century, packaged dry pastas, canned pasta products and sauces began to adorn the shelves of supermarkets, and pasta became a staple of American life. Chef Boyardee introduced children to pasta and turned off adults to his mushy ravioli and Spaghettios.

Pasta lives on in all its glory, its unending possibilities and its delicious varieties. So while the historians continue to debate, whoever created its humble beginnings, we are thankful. Pile on the pasta, any way you like.